Studio Artist & Metalsmith

What Little Girls Are Made Of. 2011. Mixed Media. Part of bracelet series: Reality Destroys Childish Ideals.
I’m not the master of collecting but I’m practicing. I started filling a box with trinkets after going to a yard sale next door. It continued to grow as I found broken jewelry pieces on the ground. I’d mention my treasure to friends and family … poof! like magic my amount doubled. In 5th grade I made shoe box doll houses filled with makeshift furniture like thimble chairs. I took it to school just to show everyone. After all the wonderful creativity, I had saved the best pieces for last. Here they are 12 years later: a horse charm my cousin Jennifer gave me, Grandma’s pearls that her husband gave her, the pink flowers were a gift from Ms. Ashely Thompson, and the blue stone under it, came from a ring at the yard sale that started it all.
That’s the history behind it, now let’s make it fine arty. This part should help explain the series title if your cultural background didn’t let you see it as natural. Okay, starting point is that this bracelet represents the ideals of the American little girl. From the beginning they are taught to follow their dreams. Since they have many years ahead of them, they have a lot of day dreams. Like “What am I going to get for Christmas?” or “What will I be when I grow up?” or “Who will I fall in love with and marry?”. One day they’ll find out that Santa’s not real, that you have to have money and luck to grow up, and marriage? they’re too afraid of divorce. But after it all, we still want to hold on to those wonderful American Dreams. So we start the whole cycle over again by teaching our little babies the same ideals. In a nutshell: Ignorance is bliss and beautiful, then you  grow up and your only choice is reality.
Bracelett Series won 3rd place in the 2013 Greenville Museum of Art Biennial Juried Exhibition. Greenville, NC. 

What Little Girls Are Made Of. 2011. Mixed Media. Part of bracelet series: Reality Destroys Childish Ideals.

I’m not the master of collecting but I’m practicing. I started filling a box with trinkets after going to a yard sale next door. It continued to grow as I found broken jewelry pieces on the ground. I’d mention my treasure to friends and family … poof! like magic my amount doubled. In 5th grade I made shoe box doll houses filled with makeshift furniture like thimble chairs. I took it to school just to show everyone. After all the wonderful creativity, I had saved the best pieces for last. Here they are 12 years later: a horse charm my cousin Jennifer gave me, Grandma’s pearls that her husband gave her, the pink flowers were a gift from Ms. Ashely Thompson, and the blue stone under it, came from a ring at the yard sale that started it all.

That’s the history behind it, now let’s make it fine arty. This part should help explain the series title if your cultural background didn’t let you see it as natural. Okay, starting point is that this bracelet represents the ideals of the American little girl. From the beginning they are taught to follow their dreams. Since they have many years ahead of them, they have a lot of day dreams. Like “What am I going to get for Christmas?” or “What will I be when I grow up?” or “Who will I fall in love with and marry?”. One day they’ll find out that Santa’s not real, that you have to have money and luck to grow up, and marriage? they’re too afraid of divorce. But after it all, we still want to hold on to those wonderful American Dreams. So we start the whole cycle over again by teaching our little babies the same ideals. In a nutshell: Ignorance is bliss and beautiful, then you  grow up and your only choice is reality.

Bracelett Series won 3rd place in the 2013 Greenville Museum of Art Biennial Juried Exhibition. Greenville, NC. 

  • 29 November 2013
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