Studio Artist & Metalsmith

“I always assumed my inspirations came from the places I had traveled to. Looking back I realize that the home I had left behind, what I had taken for granted was my biggest inspiration of all.”

—   June 9th, 2011

Mama’s Gardenia Ring Set. 2012. Pierced, Fabricated, Brass, Cast Sterling Silver from carved wax originals, & Recycled Fabric.

Exhibited in the 2014 HANDCRAFTED (Feb. 1 - May 18), located at the Maria V. Howard Arts Center in Rocky Mount, NC.

Love Note Vessel. 2012. Powder-coat on copper, electro formed element, found objects, beeswax covered camilla flower.

Exhibited in the 2014 HANDCRAFTED (Feb. 1 - May 18), located at the Maria V. Howard Arts Center in Rocky Mount, NC.

Exhibited in the 2013 Greenville Museum of Art Biennial Juried Exhibition. Greenville, NC.  

Remembering Italy: Painted Enamel Series. 2012. Enamel on copper, cotton, fabricated copper settings.

Exhibited in the 2013 Greenville Museum of Art Biennial Juried Exhibition. Greenville, NC.  

Bolo Tie: The Symbolic Iris, Passion Flower, & Forget-Me-Not. 2012. Enamel on copper, brass, leather cord.

Exhibited in the 2013 Greenville Museum of Art Biennial Juried Exhibition. Greenville, NC.  

Sewing Series II: In Memory of My Granny Gladys Daniel. 2012. Copper, fabric, and cast white bronze straight pins.

Sewing Series I: In Honor of My Great Aunt Margie. 2012. White bronze, fabric, heirloom sewing stool.

Exhibited in the 56th National Juried Art Show (June 1 - Sept. 22, 2013) at the Maria V. Howard Arts Center in Rocky Mount, NC.

Holding On. Part of bracelet series: Reality Destroys Childish Ideals. 2012. Fabricated copper clasp and chain, recycled fabric, image transfer of me and Ashely Thompson on a beach in Italy (she gave me locket).

Bracelett Series won 3rd place in the 2013 Greenville Museum of Art Biennial Juried Exhibition. Greenville, NC.  

What Little Girls Are Made Of. 2011. Mixed Media. Part of bracelet series: Reality Destroys Childish Ideals.
I’m not the master of collecting but I’m practicing. I started filling a box with trinkets after going to a yard sale next door. It continued to grow as I found broken jewelry pieces on the ground. I’d mention my treasure to friends and family … poof! like magic my amount doubled. In 5th grade I made shoe box doll houses filled with makeshift furniture like thimble chairs. I took it to school just to show everyone. After all the wonderful creativity, I had saved the best pieces for last. Here they are 12 years later: a horse charm my cousin Jennifer gave me, Grandma’s pearls that her husband gave her, the pink flowers were a gift from Ms. Ashely Thompson, and the blue stone under it, came from a ring at the yard sale that started it all.
That’s the history behind it, now let’s make it fine arty. This part should help explain the series title if your cultural background didn’t let you see it as natural. Okay, starting point is that this bracelet represents the ideals of the American little girl. From the beginning they are taught to follow their dreams. Since they have many years ahead of them, they have a lot of day dreams. Like “What am I going to get for Christmas?” or “What will I be when I grow up?” or “Who will I fall in love with and marry?”. One day they’ll find out that Santa’s not real, that you have to have money and luck to grow up, and marriage? they’re too afraid of divorce. But after it all, we still want to hold on to those wonderful American Dreams. So we start the whole cycle over again by teaching our little babies the same ideals. In a nutshell: Ignorance is bliss and beautiful, then you  grow up and your only choice is reality.
Bracelett Series won 3rd place in the 2013 Greenville Museum of Art Biennial Juried Exhibition. Greenville, NC. 

What Little Girls Are Made Of. 2011. Mixed Media. Part of bracelet series: Reality Destroys Childish Ideals.

I’m not the master of collecting but I’m practicing. I started filling a box with trinkets after going to a yard sale next door. It continued to grow as I found broken jewelry pieces on the ground. I’d mention my treasure to friends and family … poof! like magic my amount doubled. In 5th grade I made shoe box doll houses filled with makeshift furniture like thimble chairs. I took it to school just to show everyone. After all the wonderful creativity, I had saved the best pieces for last. Here they are 12 years later: a horse charm my cousin Jennifer gave me, Grandma’s pearls that her husband gave her, the pink flowers were a gift from Ms. Ashely Thompson, and the blue stone under it, came from a ring at the yard sale that started it all.

That’s the history behind it, now let’s make it fine arty. This part should help explain the series title if your cultural background didn’t let you see it as natural. Okay, starting point is that this bracelet represents the ideals of the American little girl. From the beginning they are taught to follow their dreams. Since they have many years ahead of them, they have a lot of day dreams. Like “What am I going to get for Christmas?” or “What will I be when I grow up?” or “Who will I fall in love with and marry?”. One day they’ll find out that Santa’s not real, that you have to have money and luck to grow up, and marriage? they’re too afraid of divorce. But after it all, we still want to hold on to those wonderful American Dreams. So we start the whole cycle over again by teaching our little babies the same ideals. In a nutshell: Ignorance is bliss and beautiful, then you  grow up and your only choice is reality.

Bracelett Series won 3rd place in the 2013 Greenville Museum of Art Biennial Juried Exhibition. Greenville, NC. 

Little Clouds of Hopes and Dreams. 2011. Mixed Media.
All my life, at least starting in kindergarden, I’ve been told to follow my dreams. Of course these included goals that were taught to me as important. The little clouds in the sky are hard to reach because they’re so far away. That’s why they say they’re for the birds. Towards the ending of college I was almost able to touch the clouds. But the closer I got to them the more transparent they became. The support system I had growing up saying go get ‘em, was now saying are you sure about that? Every choice I have to make for myself. The hardest part is figuring out what I want, what’s best for me, and truly following your gut. I’m glad I’ve excepted life as a learning experience.
"There’s something sexy and intimate about this piece. I didn’t want to bring it up but since she mentioned it."      - Bob Ebendorf